Be more productive in your job

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Control your mind in your job
Mental exercises and activities to be more productive in the workplace

Have you felt like you can’t deal with your thoughts? Like if your mind was visiting a ton of places it shouldn’t be. It’s possible that we’ve all felt like that once in our life; the biggest problem is that to be productive, our mind and body have to be synchronized and healthy. Knowing how to handle mental blocks is extremely important to continue your job without accumulating pressure and end up collapsing.

To avoid being mentally blocked, or feeling extremely frustrated and exhausted, we can do some exercises that will allow us to clear our mind and refresh it from all our burdens, but before we do this, we need to make sure we’re giving our mind what it deserves.

It’s important that you give your brain the nutrients it needs to work full power. To start, acknowledge your current nutrition status; if you’re doing something wrong, make changes as fast as you can. Nuts, almonds, fresh fruits and water are foods that will make your brain function better.
It’s easy to grab a sugared coffee instead of a green apple, but if you do so, you’ll start seeing results fast and your work productivity will increase.

Now, analyze what’s making you feel that way; maybe too much pressure in your job, many things to be done with little to no time, or maybe personal issues. Identifying the problem is a big step to get to the place where you can ease your thoughts a bit.

Be more productive in your job
Be more productive in your job

Now, analyze what’s making you feel that way; maybe too much pressure in your job, many things to be done with little to no time, or maybe personal issues. Identifying the problem is a big step to get to the place where you can ease your thoughts a bit.

We’ll talk about some exercises or activities you can do to bring your mind back to a peaceful state, where it could be free and ready to work better.

  1. Control your breaths: Just when you feel like you’ll explode or you can’t dominate your thoughts, bring your eyes to the darkness and listen to your breaths, don’t let anything get in the way of you and your respiration; do this for about 5 minutes or until you feel more calmed. This technique is very efficient; you can practice it every night, and if you play some relaxation music, you’ll have better results.
  2. Learn more: If you feel you can’t learn or concentrate, stimulate your brain. If you read your mind will unlock itself, you can read whatever you enjoy; you’ll be able to concentrate on things that you couldn’t before. Play cards, puzzles, Sudoku; all these activities force you to think, and will prepare your mind for other situations.
  3. Think about things you’d like: It’s very effective to think about the future when living uncomfortable situations in the present, or thinking about the rewards we’ll be able to enjoy after doing these assignments. For example: you’re in the office with 30 folders to go through, you can’t take it anymore, all you want is to go home; if you do so, you’ll leave everything for later or lose your job, and if you finish, you can have a small vacation at the end of the month. You’ll be motivated and have a reason why to keep on trying.
  4. Play with your respiration: Inhale 4-7 times very quickly (about a second per breath), then retain your breath inside of your lungs for as long as you can, and finally exhale the same way you inhaled, that is to say, disposing of the air in short breaths.
  5. Treat yourself: Your brain needs time to breathe too. Think about things that make you feel good and do them (maybe every hour). Work until you feel the need to stop, when so, go grab a healthy snack, listen to your playlist, and just relax.
  6. Think about happy moments you lived or will live: Remembering good times might make you feel a little bit better; you can get ideas of things to do with your relatives, plan activities that make you feel satisfied, you’ll be enthusiastic and in a better mood.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / freedigitalphotos.net